The Link Between Osteoporosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Diabetes

Sources: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-2/ https://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/what-is-rheumatoid-arthritis.php https://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/osteoarthritis/articles/oa-prevention.php https://www.nof.org/patients/what-is-osteoporosis/ https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323238.php

It is becoming more common to notice links between things such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes.

Before we dive into information about the relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis as well as the link between type 2 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis we’re going to discuss what each thing is. Later we will discuss the possible relationships and what you can do to prevent the onset of these diseases. 

What is Osteoporosis, Rheumatoid arthritis and Diabetes?

  • Osteoporosis: is a disease in the bone that forms when the body has a major decrease in bone mass either by losing it, or making too little of it. Osteoporosis causes weak bones that can easily break, even from simple movements, this is why it is so serious. This type of disease can make your bone look almost like honeycomb because it becomes so fragile.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis: is an autoimmune disease that attacks the joints. This type of disease creates inflammation in the tissue of the joints causing pain and swelling in the joints. If this type of disease goes untreated, joints can become loose and unstable making it more difficult to move.
  • Type 2 Diabetes: is a disease that forms when the blood sugar levels in the body are high because your body isn’t able to use insulin properly. This disease causes insulin resistance, making it difficult to regulate the blood sugar levels in the body.

What is the link between type 2 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis?

With the large amount of people of the United States struggling with diseases such as type 2 diabetes, it is becoming more common to notice links between things such as rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. In 2013 a study was conducted of over 100,000 individuals aged 40 and older. Of the 100,000, 8.5% of these individuals had diabetes. Once the study was able to determine the controlled risk factors, they found that those with diabetes were 33% more likely to have other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

The main link found between these diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes is that they both cause inflammation that is considered chronic, in the body. There are other possible links such as the steroids used to treat rheumatoid arthritis can raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. As well as those who have arthritis are less likely to exercise due to the pain that they feel, leading them to be more sedentary, which is a risk factor of type 2 diabetes. The relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis can be similar to the link between type 2 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis; those who are experiencing chronic pain are less likely to be active, and the less active you are, the more likely it is to develop type 2 diabetes.

What You Should Do

Although arthritis is painful, those who are more active tend to have less pain. Especially those who have diabetes and are active, exhibiting less pain the back, shoulders and neck. The best way to prevent the onset of diseases such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes are as follows:

  • Maintain a healthy weight: having excess weight on your body is a leading factor in many
    diseases because it not only adds extra pressure on the joints but also affects your organs.
  • Maintain your blood sugar: regulating your blood sugar levels can help stop the formation of molecules that damage the cartilage, and cause inflammation.
  • Physical activity: although it may be one of the last things on your list to do, getting up and getting active is a great way to not only keep your joints healthy but also helps you drop those extra pounds. Exercise, even if it is light can help you strengthen your muscles and organs and lower your risk of many other dangerous diseases.

If you think that you could be at risk for any of the diseases we discussed in this article, make sure to speak to a medical professional about your concerns and/or lifestyle changes.

Sources:

www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-2/

www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/what-is-rheumatoid-arthritis.php

www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/osteoarthritis/articles/oa-prevention.php

www.nof.org/patients/what-is-osteoporosis/

www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323238.php

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